Posts made in 2016

Karama and the Call for Interfaith Peace and Coexistence

Posted by on Dec 5, 2016 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 1 comment

Karama and the Call for Interfaith Peace and Coexistence

The following post was written by Brittany Bruner, a former Humanities Center intern. I spent a semester in Jordan during a fraught moment in history. The Syrian refugee crisis is rampant all over the world. It is especially troubling in the Middle East, and in Jordan, a country that houses over one million Syrian refugees, not to mention large quantities of other refugees. Extreme poverty, despair, and hopelessness is a devastating reality for many people, and it can also lead to extremism. While Jordan has remained relatively peaceful, it is surrounded by a volatile region. Naturally, the...

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Finding a Place for Lady Liberty: Thoughts on Sukorov, Napoleon, and Morrison

Posted by on Nov 28, 2016 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

Finding a Place for Lady Liberty: Thoughts on Sukorov, Napoleon, and Morrison

Next week, I’m introducing Alexander Sukorov’s Francofonia, a history about the Louvre under Nazi occupation and a philosophical inquiry into art and historical consciousness, at BYU’s International Cinema. In this genre-defying film, the figure of Marianne, the French iteration of Lady Liberty who emerged during the Revolution, is occasionally shown flitting about the empty and darkened galleries of the Louvre, declaring the republican maxim “liberté, égalité, fraternité” in her best stage whisper. This character is juxtaposed with that of Napoleon Bonaparte, who strides arrogantly around...

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Fall 2016

Posted by on Nov 17, 2016 in Faith and Imagination | 0 comments

Fall 2016

Matthew Mutter, Bard College Title: “‘What is Joy?': Yeats, Paganism, and the Passions” November 3, 2016 W.B. Yeats claimed that the governing tension of his poetic imagination could be characterized as a competition between the “swordsman” and the “saint.” His writing figures this tension in multiple ways—Oedipus v. Christ, Homer v. von Hügel, Michael Angelo v. Saint Catherine of Genoa, Cuchulai v. Patrick, “antithetical” v. “primary,” self v. soul—but the principal fault-line for Yeats is between pagan and Christian. This lecture will explore the consequences of this tension for Yeats’s...

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Teaching Creativity: Understanding Vulnerability

Posted by on Nov 14, 2016 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

Teaching Creativity: Understanding Vulnerability

“Vulnerability is the birthplace of innovation, creativity and change.” –Brené Brown, TED Talk “Listening to shame” March 2012   In a TED talk I watched recently, Brené Brown talks about life being a compilation of individuals seeking connection. The whole point of life, she says, is to make meaningful connections with people, and we strive to do that through learning, experience, relationships, etc. Sounds an awful lot like the aim of a Humanities education. Additionally, I thought about another of Brown’s talks gave on vulnerability and related it to some of the choices I have...

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Frankenstein for the Future: Questions on Creation and AI

Posted by on Nov 7, 2016 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 1 comment

Frankenstein for the Future: Questions on Creation and AI

This post was written by Carlee Schmidt, HC Undergraduate Fellow I didn’t know the Creature had a voice. I also grew up thinking the towering green figure was named Frankenstein, when actually that’s the name of the doctor who created it. My visual memory is encapsulated in a large plate my mom used during Halloween time as a kid: squared head, scars on the green smiling face, and the classic bolts in the neck. He was a festive Halloween decoration, nothing more. Until I saw Benedict Cumberbatch portray him in a filmed stage production of Frankenstein, shown for one night only as a Halloween...

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“On Faith and Imagination and the Mind of Winter, Thawing”

Posted by on Oct 31, 2016 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog, Uncategorized | 0 comments

“On Faith and Imagination and the Mind of Winter, Thawing”

In his 1929 lecture “What Is Metaphysics?” Martin Heidegger laid out a series of propositions regarding scientific attitudes, and specifically how the sciences assess their objects of study. “What should be examined are beings only, and besides that—nothing; beings alone, and further—nothing; solely beings, and beyond that—nothing.” Science, that is, should take up only those things, those “beings,” that possess some kind of material existence, leaving comparatively immaterial complexities of mood and value (and speaker and implication, to say nothing of goodness and beauty—all those...

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Winter 2017

Posted by on Oct 28, 2016 in Colloquiua | 0 comments

All Colloquia will take place in JFSB 4010 at 3:00pm unless otherwise specified. January 19 Dana Bourgerie (Asian & Near Eastern Languages) “Remembering Cambodia” January 26 Norman Wirzba (Duke University) “Agrarian Environmentalism?” February 16 Laura Zientek (Comparative Arts & Letters) “Questioning Lucan’s Nature: An examination of landscape in the Civil War” February 23 Paul Westover (English) “Where does ‘English Literature’ Live?” March 2 Deidre Lynch (Harvard University) “Cultures of Reading” March 9 Translation Studies Symposium “The Relevance of Translation...

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Collaborative Language Learning

Posted by on Oct 24, 2016 in Featured Projects, Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 1 comment

Collaborative Language Learning

This post features the recent research of Dr. Greg Thompson, Spanish and Portuguese Department One of the challenges in learning a foreign language, especially in the first years, is communicating with native speakers of the target language. Given the limited contact that many foreign language students have with native speakers of that language, they are often ill-prepared when they need to communicate outside of the confines of the classroom. Greg Thompson and Rob Martinsen of the Department of Spanish and Portuguese have been working to help first and second year students engage in...

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It’s None of Your Business: Women in the Workplace

Posted by on Oct 17, 2016 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 3 comments

It’s None of Your Business: Women in the Workplace

In the current political climate, and in conjunction with certain personal experiences, it is relevant to have a blog post about “the woman question.” There has been quite the uproar especially with the leaked tapes and Donald Trump’s reputation with women and Hillary Clinton being the first woman to win a major party nomination. Heather Belnap Jensen wrote a fabulous post last winter on her relationship with academia. Over the past few weeks, I have been thinking a lot about women in leadership and professional positions.   Women in the workplace has been a controversial topic for a...

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2016

Posted by on Oct 14, 2016 in ORCA Symposium | 0 comments

Friday, October 14th from 3:00 – 4:30 PM in room 4010 JFSB. Tamara Thomson — “The Intersection of Truth, Memory, and Fiction in State Mental Hospital Patient Experience” Relying upon my research for context and as a foundation, I have composed six short stories dealing with the experiences of the youth patients and staff at the State Hospital which are based on the actual relationships and events that I experienced while working there in the early 1990’s. I believe that a fictive narrative can go beyond the mere facts of my experience, and the experience of those I have interviewed, to...

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