Posts by hceditor

Aren’t We All Bleak Liberals?

Posted by on Sep 11, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

Aren’t We All Bleak Liberals?

This post was written by Matthew Wickman, Founding Director of the Humanities Center If one reads academic news media like The Chronicle of Higher Education or Inside Higher Ed—or, for that matter, The New York Times—one quickly ascertains that these aren’t the best of times for the humanities. Lending voice to that sentiment a few years ago, in 2014, the Modern Language Association made “Vulnerable Times” its theme for its large annual conference. In her presidential address at the convention, Marianne Hirsch of Columbia University acknowledged these sources of uncomfortable vulnerability...

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2017

Posted by on Aug 5, 2017 in ORCA Symposium | 0 comments

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Archipelagoes/Oceans/Americas: Some Interdisciplinary and Interinstitutional Collaborations

Posted by on Jun 12, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

Archipelagoes/Oceans/Americas: Some Interdisciplinary and Interinstitutional Collaborations

This post was written by Brian Russell Roberts, Humanities Center Fellow. June 12, 2017 Since the BYU Humanities Center was founded in 2012, one of its greatest contributions to intellectual life in the Humanities College has been its support for several faculty research groups, ranging from Adaptation Studies to Jazz-Blues for the Humanities, from Derrida and the Question of Religion to Environmental Humanities, and from Translation Studies to Applied Humanities. According to its website, the Center is currently supporting eleven such groups, each independently run and organized by a core...

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In Britain, Walking. And Thinking.

Posted by on May 15, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

In Britain, Walking. And Thinking.

This post was written by Holly Boud, Humanities Center intern. I should preface this post by saying that I am spending two months touring the UK on a British literature and landscape tour. Everything that follows is reflective of this experience. This study abroad focuses on understanding the literature of Britain in different eras as well as creative writing. Creative writing is a new pursuit for me. These blog posts have been the most creative writing I have done outside of my personal journal, so I am a novice at best. I am a person that spends more time than is healthy worrying about my...

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Leadership Material

Posted by on May 8, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 1 comment

Leadership Material

This post was written by Ed Cutler, HC Fellow, English Department An opinion piece in a recent New York Times carries a provocative title: “Not Leadership Material? Good. The World Needs Followers.” The author is Susan Cain, founder of Quiet Revolution, a for-profit company that aims to “unlock the power of introverts for the benefit of us all.” In her piece, Cain advises that university admissions committees lose their fixation on “leadership potential” when considering prospective students. “If college admissions offices show us whom and what we value, then we seem to think that the ideal...

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Winter 2017

Posted by on Mar 17, 2017 in Faith and Imagination | 0 comments

Winter 2017

Jeffrey Kosky, Washington & Lee University Title: “Portraits of Enchanting Secularity: Notes on faces, prayers, and criticism for those disenchanted with disenchantment” May 12, 2017 Ever since Max Weber, in 1917, famously characterized “the fate of our times” with the memorable phrase “the disenchantment of the world,” it has been customary to equate modernity, secularity, and disenchantment. One form this disenchantment takes is a cold, critical spirit that pervades modern life in general and academic writing in particular. But a significant number of people, both inside and outside...

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Fall 2017

Posted by on Mar 4, 2017 in Colloquiua | 0 comments

All Colloquia will take place in JFSB 4010 at 3:00pm unless otherwise specified. September 14 Roundtable Discussion “Is Linguistics Part of the Humanities?” September 21 Steve Riep (Asian & Near Eastern Languages) “Rethinking War: Unofficial History, Missing Veterans, and “Concrete” Images of (Dis)ability” September 28          **4101 JFSB** Hester Oberman (University of Arizona) “Religion and Medical & Health Humanities” October 12 Christian Ahihou (French & Italian)  “The Issue of African Emigration in Le ventre de l’Atlantique by Fatou...

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Spring 2017

Posted by on Jan 17, 2017 in Colloquiua | 0 comments

All Colloquia will take place in JFSB 4010 at 3:00pm unless otherwise specified. May 18 Marie Orton (French & Italian) “Migration Literature and the Politics of Changing National...

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Fall 2016

Posted by on Nov 17, 2016 in Faith and Imagination | 0 comments

Fall 2016

Matthew Mutter, Bard College Title: “‘What is Joy?': Yeats, Paganism, and the Passions” November 3, 2016 W.B. Yeats claimed that the governing tension of his poetic imagination could be characterized as a competition between the “swordsman” and the “saint.” His writing figures this tension in multiple ways—Oedipus v. Christ, Homer v. von Hügel, Michael Angelo v. Saint Catherine of Genoa, Cuchulai v. Patrick, “antithetical” v. “primary,” self v. soul—but the principal fault-line for Yeats is between pagan and Christian. This lecture will explore the consequences of this tension for Yeats’s...

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Winter 2017

Posted by on Oct 28, 2016 in Colloquiua | 0 comments

All Colloquia will take place in JFSB 4010 at 3:00pm unless otherwise specified. January 19 Dana Bourgerie (Asian & Near Eastern Languages) “Remembering Cambodia” January 26 Norman Wirzba (Duke University) “Agrarian Environmentalism?” February 16 Laura Zientek (Comparative Arts & Letters) “Questioning Lucan’s Nature: An examination of landscape in the Civil War” February 23 Paul Westover (English) “Where does ‘English Literature’ Live?” March 2 Deidre Lynch (Harvard University) “Cultures of Reading” March 9 Translation Studies Symposium “The Relevance of Translation...

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