Humanities Center Blog

The Humanities, Medicine and Art in the Sixteenth Century

Posted by on Mar 19, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

The Humanities, Medicine and Art in the Sixteenth Century

This post was written by Charlotte Stanford, HC Fellow, Department of Comparative Arts & Letters When I say I am a medievalist and that I am interested in the study of medicine, I often encounter skepticism—if not a frisson of actual horror. Wasn’t that an age that practiced bloodletting? That didn’t believe in bathing? That lived in squalor worthy of a Monty Python skit, complete with dead cats? Well, yes, their paradigms of health were different from ours, and some of their practices were crude and unregulated compared with the precision of modern methods, but there is a kind of...

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An Appreciation for Wonder-Driven Research

Posted by on Mar 13, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

An Appreciation for Wonder-Driven Research

This post was written by Janis Nuckolls, HC Faculty Fellow As this is my last official post as a member of the first Humanities Center executive committee, I want to publicly thank (even though thanking seems paltry and inadequate) our founding director Matt Wickman, whose vision, wit, energy, eloquence, and excitement for ALL THINGS has helped to infuse my thinking and energy with a certain scintillation, which I do not expect that anyone but me has noticed, but yeah, it’s been happening. . . Our themes and visitors, especially some of our recent guests, like Rita Felski, and her book The...

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Fences

Posted by on Mar 6, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

Fences

This post was written by Andrew Rees, HC Undergraduate Student Fellow As I sit in the twilight of my undergraduate experience at BYU, I hope you will indulge me a little nostalgia. To do so, I’ll refer you to one of my childhood favorites: The Fellowship of the Ring and J.R.R. Tolkien’s timeless words: “The wide world is all about you: you can fence yourselves in, but you cannot for ever fence it out.” Come April, I’ll have to leave behind many people and things that I have come to love. But today I’m not writing about what I’ll be leaving behind, but what I’ll be taking with me: my...

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Sympathies and Natural Histories 

Posted by on Feb 27, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 1 comment

Sympathies and Natural Histories 

This post was written by Holly Boud, HC Intern “How little the real characteristics of the working-classes are known to those who are outside them, how little their natural history has been studied, is sufficiently disclosed by our Art as well as by our political and social theories.” “The greatest benefit we owe to the artist, whether painter, poet, or novelist, is the extension of our sympathies.” In my Victorian seminar, we read from George Eliot’s “A Natural History of German Life” (1856) and discussed the origins of natural history studies. What do you think of when you hear “natural...

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Negotiating Mortality in Art

Posted by on Feb 21, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

Negotiating Mortality in Art

This post was written by Benjamin Jacob, HC Student Fellow Recently, I listened to a recording of the Choir at King’s College, Cambridge performing Mozart’s Requiem Mass in D Minor. As it was the first time that I had listened to a requiem mass by any composer, I looked up an English translation of the Latin lyrics.  I found the contrasting images presented in the translation to be fascinating. The work begins by speaking of “eternal rest” and “perpetual light” before quickly descending into a frightening message of the “day of wrath.” The speaker of the mass exclaims, “I groan like a guilty...

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Juan Rulfo’s Journey through Film

Posted by on Feb 6, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

Juan Rulfo’s Journey through Film

This post features the work of Douglas Weatherford, Spanish and Portuguese Department This year (2017) Mexico celebrates the centennial of one of its most beloved and iconic authors, Juan Rulfo (1917-1986). Although best known for two groundbreaking pieces of narrative fiction (El Llano en llamas, 1953 and Pedro Páramo, 1955), Rulfo was also an avid photographer and film aficionado who participated in his nation’s film industry as a scriptwriter and reviewer, as an historical consultant, as a location scout, and as a one-time actor. Weatherford has spent the last decade helping to rewrite...

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