Humanities Center Blog

Archipelagoes/Oceans/Americas: Some Interdisciplinary and Interinstitutional Collaborations

Posted by on Jun 12, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

Archipelagoes/Oceans/Americas: Some Interdisciplinary and Interinstitutional Collaborations

This post was written by Brian Russell Roberts, Humanities Center Fellow. June 12, 2017 Since the BYU Humanities Center was founded in 2012, one of its greatest contributions to intellectual life in the Humanities College has been its support for several faculty research groups, ranging from Adaptation Studies to Jazz-Blues for the Humanities, from Derrida and the Question of Religion to Environmental Humanities, and from Translation Studies to Applied Humanities. According to its website, the Center is currently supporting eleven such groups, each independently run and organized by a core...

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In Britain, Walking. And Thinking.

Posted by on May 15, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

In Britain, Walking. And Thinking.

This post was written by Holly Boud, Humanities Center intern. I should preface this post by saying that I am spending two months touring the UK on a British literature and landscape tour. Everything that follows is reflective of this experience. This study abroad focuses on understanding the literature of Britain in different eras as well as creative writing. Creative writing is a new pursuit for me. These blog posts have been the most creative writing I have done outside of my personal journal, so I am a novice at best. I am a person that spends more time than is healthy worrying about my...

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Leadership Material

Posted by on May 8, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 1 comment

Leadership Material

This post was written by Ed Cutler, HC Fellow, English Department An opinion piece in a recent New York Times carries a provocative title: “Not Leadership Material? Good. The World Needs Followers.” The author is Susan Cain, founder of Quiet Revolution, a for-profit company that aims to “unlock the power of introverts for the benefit of us all.” In her piece, Cain advises that university admissions committees lose their fixation on “leadership potential” when considering prospective students. “If college admissions offices show us whom and what we value, then we seem to think that the ideal...

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The BYU Humanities Center at 5(0)

Posted by on Apr 9, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

The BYU Humanities Center at 5(0)

This past weekend I celebrated a milestone birthday: I’m 80. Alright, shave three decades off that number, though in some ways I feel 80. Years ago, when a department colleague turned 50, his friends – or, perhaps, sworn enemies – taped a picture on his door of him lying in a coffin, smiling. I believe his face was superimposed (the prehistory of photo shopping). The image incited laughter, though I also shuddered. Fifty? So today, I must acknowledge, “La mort, c’est moi!” (Happily, this colleague is still very actively and vitally with us. Apparently, then, there’s hope.) Such birthdays can...

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How and Why Language Changes

Posted by on Apr 2, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

How and Why Language Changes

This post was written by Mark Davies, HC Fellow, Linguistics Department Why do languages change? The answers that some linguists tended to give 100-150 years ago strike us as being quite absurd nowadays. For example, they sometimes looked to the physical environment as a motivation for language change, such as the fact that the Germanic peoples in the Alps in 2000-3000 BC huffed and puffed so much as they were going up and down the mountains that they turned the “stops” (p, t, k) from Proto-Indo-European (spoken about 3000-5000 BC) into “fricatives” (f, th, h; a change known as Grimms Law),...

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Beauty and Terror: Subjection and the “Watery Part of the World”

Posted by on Mar 27, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

Beauty and Terror: Subjection and the “Watery Part of the World”

This post was written by Holly Boud, Humanities Center Intern Have you ever noticed how many water metaphors we use in our language? Brainstorming. Surfing the web. Glass half-full (or empty). First/second/third wave feminism, etc. Our language is saturated … (no wait) … overflowing … (argh) … dripping … (see what I mean?) with water imagery. Isn’t it strange then how we sometimes forget the power of water (oceans, etc.) in our research?   On Thursday, the Humanities Center hosted Jeff McCarthy, Director of Environmental Humanities the University of Utah, for a colloquium. His...

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