Humanities Center Blog

Juan Rulfo’s Journey through Film

Posted by on Feb 6, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

Juan Rulfo’s Journey through Film

This post features the work of Douglas Weatherford, Spanish and Portuguese Department This year (2017) Mexico celebrates the centennial of one of its most beloved and iconic authors, Juan Rulfo (1917-1986). Although best known for two groundbreaking pieces of narrative fiction (El Llano en llamas, 1953 and Pedro Páramo, 1955), Rulfo was also an avid photographer and film aficionado who participated in his nation’s film industry as a scriptwriter and reviewer, as an historical consultant, as a location scout, and as a one-time actor. Weatherford has spent the last decade helping to rewrite...

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On Longing: The Peach of the Humanities

Posted by on Jan 30, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 1 comment

On Longing: The Peach of the Humanities

This post was written by Kristen Blair, HC Undergraduate Student Fellow In a moment of particularly moving emotion, William Shakespeare’s Prince Hamlet bemoans his mother’s hasty transfer of affections. In his suffering, he says: O, that this too too solid flesh would melt, Thaw and resolve itself into a dew, How weary, stale, flat and unprofitable Seem to me all the uses of this world!1  My first time reading Hamlet, I recall stopping at this phrase to read it again and again, surprised at my own emotion. This image of a mind trapped in a body, flesh “melting” away and distilling into a...

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Raising a Glass

Posted by on Jan 23, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 1 comment

Raising a Glass

This post was written by Holly Boud, HC intern Here I am, sitting on a stool in my kitchen in my run-down Orem apartment eating turkey bacon (God’s gift to mankind). The door of my room hangs unevenly on its hinges. My light is broken. My toilet bowl has a hard water ring that I have never been able to scrub off. The lighting is dim, making the bleak January nights in Utah even more dismal. But I am happy. Why? No, despite the cliches of what brings happiness, I am not dating anyone. No, I have not come into any significant sum of money (quite the opposite). I am happy as I contemplate the...

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The 2017 Conference of the Modern Language Association: Notes from Underground

Posted by on Jan 17, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

The 2017 Conference of the Modern Language Association: Notes from Underground

This post was written by Matthew Wickman, Founding Director of the BYU Humanities Center I’ve attended the conference of the Modern Language Association most years since I arrived at BYU in 2000. I thought I might take off this year’s conference (held in Philadelphia), but then decided late in the game to attend, after all. Why? Because, for all its excesses and clear signs of decay (with shrinking numbers of attendees, a disappearing job interview scene, etc.), MLA remains one of the best places to get a bead on what’s “going on” in the humanities, particularly in literary studies. And,...

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2017: Here’s to those who dream!

Posted by on Jan 9, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

2017: Here’s to those who dream!

This post was written by Benjamin Jacob, HC Student Fellow, Interdisciplinary Studies major One of the most poignant moments in the wonderful new film “La La Land” occurs as the aspiring actress Mia (played by Emma Stone) auditions for a part in a movie.  She auditions by singing the story of her aunt, an eccentric artist, who jumped into the Seine in the dead of winter, barefoot.  Mia sings,   She smiled, Leapt, without looking And she tumbled into the Seine! The water was freezing. She spent a month sneezing, But said she would do it, again.   Mia then describes why this occurrence...

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Karama and the Call for Interfaith Peace and Coexistence

Posted by on Dec 5, 2016 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 1 comment

Karama and the Call for Interfaith Peace and Coexistence

The following post was written by Brittany Bruner, a former Humanities Center intern. I spent a semester in Jordan during a fraught moment in history. The Syrian refugee crisis is rampant all over the world. It is especially troubling in the Middle East, and in Jordan, a country that houses over one million Syrian refugees, not to mention large quantities of other refugees. Extreme poverty, despair, and hopelessness is a devastating reality for many people, and it can also lead to extremism. While Jordan has remained relatively peaceful, it is surrounded by a volatile region. Naturally, the...

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