Humanities Center Blog

Pastry’s Power to Save the World

Posted by on Oct 16, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

Pastry’s Power to Save the World

This post was written by Julie Allen, HC Faculty Fellow, Department of Comparative Arts and Letters I spent a weekend in Chicago recently at a conference celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Danish American Heritage Society. The society was founded in a living room in Oregon in 1977 as a response to the cultural heritage craze ignited by Alex Haley’s Roots, somewhat akin to the prophet Elijah’s injunction to turn our hearts to our forefathers. The conference, themed “Danish American Fusion,” featured all manner of fascinating presentations that showcased the ways in which Danish culture...

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When the nation, suicidal

Posted by on Oct 9, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 2 comments

When the nation, suicidal

This blog post was written by Hannah Leavitt, Humanities Center Student Fellow This month, 100 years will have passed since the October Revolution of 1917, the uprising that shook Europe and demolished the Russian Empire and its monarchy. During the ensuing civil war, the rise of communist power, and the changes and chaos that Bolshevik cataclysm brought to Eastern Europe—Anna Akhmatova, a poet fiercely loyal to her native-born Russia, penned her poem often titled by its first line, in reference to the horrors Russia had experienced during World War I: When the nation, suicidal, awaited...

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Humanities as Medicine

Posted by on Oct 2, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

Humanities as Medicine

This post was written by Holly Boud, Humanities Center Intern On Thursday, the Humanities Center was pleased to host Dr. Hester Oberman of the Arizona State University. She gave an incredible talk about the new and emerging field of medical humanities and its place in the medical field, especially in terms of healing. She emphasized the importance of bringing in the humanities into the medical field, both for patients as well as for doctors. I think those of us invested in the humanities have had experiences involving the cleansing and healing power of the humanities—be it religion,...

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Franco Moretti’s Theology and BYU Approved Soft Drinks: On Learning to See, and Not See

Posted by on Sep 25, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 1 comment

Franco Moretti’s Theology and BYU Approved Soft Drinks: On Learning to See, and Not See

This post was written by Matt Wickman, Director of the BYU Humanities Center My initial motive for writing the blog post this week was to bring some attention to an event our BYU Humanities Center is hosting this Thursday, September 28th. Hester Oberman, of the University of Arizona’s Department of Religious Studies and Classics, is our colloquium guest, and she will be discussing her research in the emergent field of medical humanities. Oberman was part of a team of scholars investigating this subject who were supported by a Mellon grant awarded to institutions affiliated with the global...

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Compactness

Posted by on Sep 18, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

Compactness

This post was written by Elisabeth Loveland, Humanities Center Student Fellow Humanities scholars are more or less challenged to cope, on an existential level, with an infinite volume of factoids and interpretations-on-said-factoids, all of which cannot be neatly jammed into your term paper’s bibliography, let alone your personal knowledge. You don’t have infinite years, you don’t have infinite neurons, and the Library of Alexandria burned down anyway. But awareness of his own pitiable circumstance is no consolation to the listless bookworm inching around the library in...

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Aren’t We All Bleak Liberals?

Posted by on Sep 11, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

Aren’t We All Bleak Liberals?

This post was written by Matthew Wickman, Founding Director of the Humanities Center If one reads academic news media like The Chronicle of Higher Education or Inside Higher Ed—or, for that matter, The New York Times—one quickly ascertains that these aren’t the best of times for the humanities. Lending voice to that sentiment a few years ago, in 2014, the Modern Language Association made “Vulnerable Times” its theme for its large annual conference. In her presidential address at the convention, Marianne Hirsch of Columbia University acknowledged these sources of uncomfortable vulnerability...

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