Humanities Center Blog

Silent Art

Posted by on Dec 4, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

Silent Art

This post was written by Benjamin Jacob, HC Student Fellow Last summer, my family embarked on a quest to see several paintings by Johannes Vermeer that we had not yet seen. Led by my intrepid mother, we traveled to museums in Frankfurt, Berlin, and Dresden specifically to see these Dutch gems.  Unfortunately for our purposes, we were disappointed at each turn.  The Vermeers, we discovered too late, were on loan for a special exhibit in Paris, Dublin, and then at the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. So, while I was in Baltimore last week and the opportunity came for me to finally...

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Digital Humanities: A Bridge between Researchers in Our College

Posted by on Nov 27, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

Digital Humanities: A Bridge between Researchers in Our College

This post was written by Mark Davies, HC Fellow, Department of Linguistics and English Language The College of Humanities has faculty from across a wide range of disciplines, including literary studies, cultural studies, linguistics, and language pedagogy. In addition to the wide range of topics covered by faculty in these different fields, there are also noticeable differences in methodology. For example, in linguistics (my area of emphasis) there is an emphasis on empiricism (“just the facts, ma’am”), replicability (the ability for another researcher to carry out the same study to verify...

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The Emotional Hook—and Am I the Fish?

Posted by on Nov 13, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

The Emotional Hook—and Am I the Fish?

This post was written by Carlee Schmidt Reber, Humanities Center Student Fellow We’ve all had one of those hodge-podge dreams where the book, TV series, and movie you recently watched mix themselves into a tangled narrative in which you are centrally involved. It’s always about ten minutes after I wake up, getting ready in the bathroom, that my mind finally starts sifting through what was real and what was dream. One of my recent combo-dreams mixed ABC’s first season of Once Upon a Time, BYUtv’s Extinct, Orson Scott Card’s Shadow of the Hegemon, and Doris Kearns Goodwin’s Team of Rivals....

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It’s a Long Story: Victorian Short Fiction Project

Posted by on Nov 6, 2017 in Featured Projects, Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

It’s a Long Story: Victorian Short Fiction Project

This blog post features the work of Leslee Thorne-Murphy, Department of English This week, the Humanities Center is pleased to feature the work of Leslee Thorne-Murphy. Over the last decade, Dr. Thorne-Murphy’s work on Victorian short fiction has become an invaluable resource to scholars interested in Victorian literature and those interested more broadly in short fiction. The project is called the “Victorian Short Fiction Project,” and it has attracted the attention of scholars worldwide and has recently been accredited by NINES (Networked Infrastructure for...

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Zivilisation’s Cultural Driveway Moments: The Decline of the (Intermountain) West

Posted by on Oct 30, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 1 comment

Zivilisation’s Cultural Driveway Moments: The Decline of the (Intermountain) West

This post was written by Rob McFarland, HC Faculty Fellow, BYU Department of German and Russian June of 1980.  We left suburban Glendora late in the afternoon, riding on the Foothill Freeway in a Chevy van with a bubble window and air-brushed beach scenes on the sides. I was a new deacon, and this was my first trip to do baptisms for the dead at the Los Angeles Temple.  When we came to the end of the Pink Floyd tape, we listened to the iconic saxophone of Gerry Rafferty’s “Baker Street” on the radio, then searched through the stations for something harder. Doug Nelson was in the front seat,...

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What’s So Funny?

Posted by on Oct 23, 2017 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 1 comment

What’s So Funny?

This post was written by Holly Boud, Humanities Center Intern This weekend I went to the Utah Shakespeare Festival for my very first time. I have lived in Utah most of my life, and somehow have never made it down, which is a pity because it is an incredible production! My friend and I attended A Midsummer Night’s Dream for its last performance. I have studied Shakespeare, but I have never actually read Midsummer nor seen it performed. So besides having a basic understanding of the plot from the references to it in popular culture, I didn’t know what to expect. Except for the four lovers and...

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