Posts by be29

One-Year Humanities Center Fellowship 2020-2021

Posted by on Jan 9, 2020 in Deadlines | 0 comments

In addition to multi-year fellowships, BYU’s Humanities Center also sponsors two one-year fellowships. Unlike the multi-year fellowships, these one-year fellowships will be awarded by application rather than appointment. The fellowship period will begin in the fall semester of 2020. Fellowships will come with a salary supplement of $2,500, a research stipend of an additional $2,500, and release from two courses (pending approval by the recipient’s department chair. Applicants should secure that approval before submitting an application). Additional money may also be available for wages and supplies. Eligibility: These fellowships are available to all full-time, post-CFS faculty in BYU’s College of Humanities. Priority will be granted to faculty who plan to use the fellowship to aid the completion of a substantive research project (for example, a book, an article, or a series of articles). These fellowships are non-renewable and will not be awarded to college faculty who have held a center fellowship in the previous three years. Application: One-year fellowships are competitive. Interested faculty will be asked to complete an application consisting of a current vita and a prospectus of no more than seven double-spaced pages. This prospectus should outline the project, make a case for its significance, explain how the fellowship will be used, and give a time frame for the project’s completion. Deadline: Applications must be received by 5:00 on March 23rd. (Note: we will extend the listed deadline from March 16th.) You may send them to me via email attachment. A committee comprised of Humanities Center fellows from different disciplines will then review and rank the applications. I will not rank applications but will play an advisory role throughout the process and am happy to provide feedback on prospective projects, so please feel free to come to me with questions or concerns. Note that the dean must approve all committee decisions. Applicants will be informed of these decisions within a few weeks of the...

Read More

2020 Upcoming Deadlines

Posted by on Jan 3, 2020 in Deadlines | 0 comments

Read More

2019

Posted by on Nov 1, 2019 in ORCA Symposium | 0 comments

The Humanities Center held its 7th annual Undergraduate Research Symposium (formerly called ORCA Symposium) on Friday, November 1st at 3:00 PM in 4010 JFSB. This year’s event featured undergraduate student research from around the college. Megan Orr — A Room of Their Own: The Paradoxical Role of the Gynaikonitis in Women’s Oppression and Independence in Antiquity This research challenges the traditional narrative of women in antiquity as paralyzed under societal, economic, and political oppression. I explored this question via study of the gynaikonitis, or women’s quarters, of antiquity. The walls of the gynaikonitis are paradigmatic of women’s oppression, yet its unique properties of isolation and exclusive access provided women the unique luxury of a space all their own. The role of the gynaikonitis is paradoxical, and stands as the proving ground for my research. Both in spite of and due to the gynaikonitis, women in antiquity found economic independence, exploratory emotional expression, and in some cases, impressive political power that forever altered the course of history. I conducted studies on-site at the ruins of Pompeii and Herculaneum in southern Italy to assess the physical attributes of the women’s quarters. This information illustrated the confines of the gynaikonitis, a framework from which one can assess the environmental psychology of the women within, as well as which independent and liberating activities were possible. I additionally surveyed artifacts from five of the greatest collections of antiquity in four European countries to formulate a comprehensive view of the world these women created. The endurance of the human spirit illustrated by these women under stringent oppression are historical proof of the following statement from Virginia Woolf: “Women have sat indoors all these millions of years, so that by this time the very walls are permeated by their creative force, which has, indeed, so overcharged the capacity of bricks and mortar that it must needs harness itself to pens and brushes and business and politics.” ― Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own (1929) Seth McCombie —  “Discovering the de-facto in Colloquial Egyptian Orthography” This research examines how the orthography of written Egyptian Colloquial Arabic (ECA) varies between different registers of formality. Since the inception of printing presses in the Middle East, nearly all Arabic printed material has been published in a formal register known as Modern Standard Arabic (MSA), which is rarely spoken by Egyptians. Meanwhile, the dialect of Arabic actually spoken in Egypt, (ECA), has enjoyed little attention in printed media and has traditionally been considered a debased form of the language. More recently, however, works written in ECA have appeared, including Bible translations produced by people who, like William Tyndale, hope to bring the Bible to Christians’ in their native tongue. Even so, there is little consistency in the orthography of these emerging works and no formal set of conventions exists. Thus, there is a need to identify what de-facto conventions may exist in the written language to inform publishing conventions and potentially lend legitimacy to the written form Arabic that is actually spoken in Egyptlan. To discover any conventions and trends that may exist informally, I first identified 25 high-frequency morphemes and words which are most subject to change in ECA, as well as their variants. I then gathered three corpora totaling about four million words of ECA text from three different sources; Twitter, Blogs, and Wikipedia, representing three different levels of formality. After calculating the frequency of these 25 items and their variants in each corpus, obvious preferences towards certain spellings in certain registers became clear. The results of this research have valuable implications for Arabic publishing houses and those...

Read More

Winter 2020

Posted by on Oct 26, 2019 in Colloquiua | 0 comments

All Colloquia will take place in JFSB 4010 at 3:00 PM unless otherwise specified. January 16 Francesca  Lawson (CAL), Steve Riep (ANEL), Mike Taylor (English), & Jim Toronto (ANEL) will lead the discussion Roundtable Discussion about the Humanities and Non-Western Religions January 23 Guide to the Classics: Dale Pratt Why Does Don Quixote Matter Today? January 31 @ 11:00 AM Lauren Klein (Emory University) The Shape of History: Elizabeth Palmer Peabody’s Feminist Visualization Work February 6 Robert Hudson (French & Italian) Clement Petitions: Translating Marot’s Verse Epistles as Critical Biography February 13 Deanna Thompson (St. Olaf College) Faith in a Traumatized World February 20 Jennifer Bown (German & Russian) Tracking the Development of Reading Proficiency February 27 Cherice Montgomery (Spanish & Portuguese) Cultivating 21st Century Competence Through Playable Case Studies March 12 Nick Mason (English) Reception Studies and the Digital Archive: What We Do, Don’t, and May Never Know about the History of Reading March 19 *CANCELED due to COVID-19* Caroline Weber (Barnard College) The Three Faces of Proust’s Duchess April 2 *CANCELED due to COVID-19* Julie Damron (Asian & Near Eastern Languages) & Jennifer Dobberfuhl Quinlan (MTC Language Curriculum Manager) Student Binge Studying, Recall and Success in a Blended Korean...

Read More

Fall 2019

Posted by on Sep 12, 2019 in Colloquiua | 0 comments

All Colloquia will take place in JFSB 4010 at 3:00 PM unless otherwise specified. September 26 Greg Thompson (Spanish & Portuguese) How foreign are the Advanced Placement world language exams? The case of ethnicity, bilinguality, and heritage learner candidates October 3 Mary Eyring (English) On Fire: Colonial Ecology and Atlantic Sympathy October 10 Jesse Crisler (English), Cinzia Noble (French & Italian), & Fred Williams (Spanish & Portuguese) Retirement Roundtable Discussion   October 24 Don Chapman (Linguistics) Say X and not Y: Claims and Arguments in Prescriptivist Discourse November 15; 12pm  (4188 JFSB) Janet Ward (University of Oklahoma) “Mother of Exiles”: The Statue of Liberty and the Legacy of the Holocaust November 21 Katie Paxman (Philosophy) Religion Founded in Skepticism: Hume’s Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion December 5 TBA...

Read More

Faith after the Anthropocene: A Prehistory

Posted by on Aug 19, 2019 in Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

Faith after the Anthropocene: A Prehistory

The Editor’s Column of the current issue of PMLA (134.3) opens with Wai Chee Dimock sharing a little of her experience recuperating from a serious accident last fall. Many things came to me during my four weeks at Spaulding Rehab: consolatory e-mails, cards, some flowers, and a care package from PMLA that kept me going for the entirety of my stay. What I never expected was a translation of a story by the Japanese writer Shiga Naoya, sent by Scott Miller, dean of the College of Humanities at Brigham Young University (BYU) and the translator. Dimock goes on to describe the Shiga piece and what moved her about it, lighting on a phrase, “collateral resilience,” that describes her impressions of the story and of what BYU specifically enables in its educational mission. I quote here one of the article’s paragraphs: Collateral resilience has no better ground than this university. Faith-based education is central to the mission of BYU: languages, however honored and flourishing, serve an instrumental function. Still, what can be done on this footing is not trivial. For the field coverage here is impressive even as a side benefit, allowing most of the primary languages of Africa, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas to be taught: Akan, Aymara, Bengali, Bicolano, Burmese, Cakchiquel, Cambodian, Cantonese, Cebuano, Dari, Fijian, Guarani, Haitian Creole, Hindi, Hmong, Ilangot, Indonesian, Japanese, Javanese, K’iche’, Korean, Laotian, Malagasy, Malay, Mandarin Chinese, Maori, Maya, Mongolian, Navajo, Pashto, Persian, Quechua, Samoan, Swahili, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tamil, Thai, Tongan, Twi, Urdu, Vietnamese, Waray, and Xhosa. Given this critical mass of spoken tongues, a further side benefit is the emergence of indigenous languages as a galvanizing force at BYU: not a relic from the past but an innovator shaping the future of the university and affecting every aspect of its intellectual life, taking higher education into the twenty-first century and beyond. The column is about indigeneity and its resurgence. In addition to BYU, Dimock discusses the University of Washington and its Department of American Indian Studies and the presence of indigenous peoples in the Pacific Northwest. UW is noteworthy on several fronts, from its interdisciplinary approach to indigenous studies and the “rights-affirming, practice-rich ethos at the UW School of Law” to the catalyzing presence of indigeneity across the UW system. “Language revitalization is at once a collateral effect and a causal agent in this environment, making indigenous languages a generative force across the university.” But she closes, notably, by circling back to BYU, discussing its law school (“a pioneer in American Indian law”), innovative pedagogy in BYU’s McKay School of Education, BYU’s minor in Native American Studies, and recent exhibits in the Museum of Art. It’s an important article that ends on an elegant and optimistic note: “looking to a future that it can create only collaboratively, resilient indigeneity gives us a road map to the future of higher education itself.” In its way, BYU is emblematic of this future. Wai Chee, who teaches at Yale, is one of the nation’s most influential literary scholars. I consider her a friend, and she is a friend of our university and college. The inspiration for her column, as she mentions in the piece, was her presence at the symposium our Humanities Center sponsored last September. It was there that she got talking with our dean, who moved her, first, by being “in attendance almost the entire time,” and second, by telling her about his experience as a missionary in Japan and what it did to inspire him not only with an affection for the Japanese language, but “with an abiding love for Japanese cinema...

Read More

Winter 2019

Posted by on Apr 3, 2019 in Faith and Imagination | 0 comments

Winter 2019

The Humanities Center welcomes Dr. Peter Howarth, Senior Lecturer in Modern Literature and National Teaching Fellow at Queen Mary, University of London, as our Faith & Imagination guest lecturer on Friday, April 12th. There will be two events held during the day, the first being a book discussion and the second, a lecture open to both faculty and interested students at 3:00 PM in the EIZ Theater (B192 JFSB). We hope you’ll join us. Title: “Marianne Moore reads the Bible” Marianne Moore is one of America’s great modernist poets. She was also one of America’s great revisers, changing or deleting the texts of her poems time and again, to the despair of her editors and the consternation of her admirers. As the full historical extent of her work finally becomes available, some of her editors charge that Moore was wilfully suppressing her difficult work to make herself more popular for audiences with short attention spans; others think she had an evolutionary concept of the poem adapting itself to new circumstances. But going back to the poems’ first drafts reveals another possible origin: the Bible class in the Higher Criticism that she was taking concurrently. If Scripture was inspired in layers, not only by hearing and writing but through recollection, re-transmission, revision and re-editing, might poetry too depend on similar re-processing in order to stay poetry? Might her modernist poetics be offering an alternative account of what inspiration means, in which textual criticism can be incorporated rather than denied?   Peter Howarth is an Associate Professor at Queen Mary, University of London. He is the author of British Poetry in the Age of Modernism (Cambridge, 2006) and The Cambridge Introduction to Modernist Poetry (2011). A National Teaching Fellow, his articles have appeared in PMLA and Textual Practice, and he is a regular reviewer for the London Review of Books. He is currently finishing The Poetry Circuit, which charts how live performance changed modern poetry, as well as being assistant Priest at St George The Martyr, Holborn,...

Read More

“Beauty is Almost Too Common”: Professor David Laraway and Outsider Art

Posted by on Mar 25, 2019 in Featured Projects, Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

“Beauty is Almost Too Common”: Professor David Laraway and Outsider Art

During the summer of 2012, shortly after Professor David Laraway had begun his doctoral coursework in Philosophy at the European Graduate School in Saas-Fee, Switzerland, he came across popular press reports featuring a botched attempt to restore a religious fresco in Spain. A well-meaning parishioner, Cecilia Giménez, had attempted to restore the painting in a village church. It had not gone well. The new painting—according to Dr. Laraway’s newest book, American Idiots: Outsider Music, Outsider Art, and the Philosophy of Incompetence—“was noteworthy precisely because of its stunning incompetence” (1). Rather than dwelling in ironic relish over the fresco’s failure, however, Dr. Laraway began to consider the philosophical implications of the fresco’s fame. What does our reaction to incompetence—especially “stunning incompetence”—suggest about our collective relation to defective or “failed” creative works? Why are we drawn to art that falls so completely short of its aspirations? In short, what happens when art goes wrong? In my interview with Dr. Laraway this past week, he was quick to clarify that the art he addresses in American Idiots “is not just poorly executed [art], but in some works, there is something going on that is of philosophical importance.” The difference between incompetent art and interestingly incompetent art, then, is that in the latter, “artists and musicians are totally faithful to their own muse even if they’re the only one that can hear the voice of that muse.” A focus on these artists and musicians can therefore help to answer a deeply philosophical problem: what can bad art teach us, in terms of ethics as well as aesthetics, about the gap we experience between a call that appears to us as infinite in its demands as the paucity of the resources that we can offer in response to that call? The book’s first chapter attempts to provide a philosophical basis for the study of incompetence in the realms of music and art. Dr. Laraway notes that philosophers have increasingly begun to devote attention to the structure of not just propositional knowledge but to embodied, practical forms of knowledge as well: that is, not just “knowing that” but also “knowing how.” Contributing to this discussion, his book explores the significance of those occasions when an artist or musician inadvertently displays a stunning lack of “know-how.” While some philosophers have recently focused on describing our most primordial relationship to the world as one of “skillful coping,” Dr. Laraway is interested in the converse: the artist or musician whose works provide evidence of a total inability to cope skillfully with what the world appears to demand of them. And he claims that that inability actually demonstrates a deep philosophical puzzle, one that becomes visible in the context of bad art. The artists that Dr. Laraway chooses to engage in his book are consequently multi-layered, from the hermit-type epic-writer Henry Darger, to indie rock darling Daniel Johnston, to the Louisiana-born artist/prophet Royal Robertson, to the New Hampshirite sixties band “The Shaggs” (if you haven’t before, you need to listen to the Shaggs). Each of these artists exemplifies the disparity between what they seem to experience as an infinite call to create and the insufficiencies of their art to respond to that call appropriately. Consideration of these artists is especially important because, according to Dr. Laraway, “artists who are more competent than they are often able to conceal, through their skillfulness and talent, the infinite demand of the call to which their work is a response. But the artists I study leave us nowhere to hide.” American Idiots, then, directs our attention to the infinite demand which somehow shines through the material product,...

Read More

The Art of Archive: Interns at the IEB

Posted by on Feb 25, 2019 in Featured Projects, Homepage Features, Humanities Center Blog | 0 comments

The Art of Archive: Interns at the IEB

This week we are delighted to feature the experience of a number of students who have fulfilled internships at the Instituto de Estudos Brasileiros (IEB), a research institute connected to the Universidade de São Paulo. BYU has a significant relationship to the IEB thanks to the coordinating efforts of Professor James Krause and others. Students who have helped out at the IEB through this partnership have stories to tell not only of their own edification, but also the enlightenment of scholars past and future as well as the Brazilian public. Two weeks ago on February 13th, 2019, Elisabete Ribas visited our beautiful (and cold) campus. Over the past five years, Elisabete—a dedicated and essential figure at the IEB—has helped to facilitate dozens of student internships from BYU. Interns have described her as going “above and beyond” in everything that she does, and as “one of the most selfless people” that they have ever met. Together, students, professors, and Elisabete met together to reminisce about their experiences of the IEB and how to sustain their work going forward. Perhaps one of the most impressive elements of the IEB internship is that Elisabete makes sure that each student is given a project that aligns with his or her own personal interests. For example, while she was an intern at the IEB, Dalila Sanabria (one of our Humanities Center undergraduate fellows this year and a Visual Arts double major) was assigned to organize an archive of documents and objects surrounding Waldisa Rússio—a prominent museologist who facilitated museum programs throughout Brazil. Along the way, Dalila gathered first hand exposure to documentation, archive methodologies, and preservation techniques for future study. She referred to this experience as an “intimate way to get to know these people and see what they cared about.” Courtney Walker, a Public Health major, similarly helped to organize the archive of Maria Lúcia Mott, a feminist activist and health reformist idol who wrote about the representation of women (as well as the lack thereof) in literature. In addition to being hand-picked for each student, these projects are also significant in their novelty. In fact, Mott passed away so recently that as part of the archive process, Courtney was able to talk to people whom Mott knew—professors who collaborated with her about literature. Courtney related that through “getting to know this person through the various versions of her work, I got to see how she evolved and developed; you can kind of piece together her work with how she interacted with others and how that changed her work, how she developed as a person.” Christina Newell’s experience was a bit different than Dalila’s or Courtney’s, in that she was given the opportunity to focus on a literary genre instead of a specific person. Literatura de Cordel refers to a kind of folk literature passed down as spoken as well as written texts in a semi-poetic format, typically sold as booklets closepinned to strings in markets (where it receives its name). She was able to gather information about cordel literatures and disseminate that information through digital and other means. Now working on a Master’s Degree in Portuguese, Christina has even used her work at the IEB in an academic setting to compare variations of a well-known story in different cordel texts. BYU’s partnership with the IEB has allowed these students to meaningfully connect with their respective projects both inside and outside the Institute, and both personally and professionally. During her stay, Dalila accompanied student interns from the University of São Paulo to a conference of curators and museologists. She detailed how much “seeing so many...

Read More

One-Year Humanities Center Fellowship

Posted by on Jan 2, 2019 in Deadlines | 0 comments

One-Year Humanities Center Fellowship 2019 – 2020 In addition to multi-year fellowships, BYU’s Humanities Center also sponsors two one-year fellowships. Unlike the multi-year fellowships, these one-year fellowships will be awarded by application rather than appointment. The fellowship period will begin in the fall semester of 2018. Fellowships will come with a salary supplement of $2,500, a research stipend of an additional $2,500, and release from two courses (pending approval by the Fellow’s department chair. Applicants should secure that approval before submitting an application). Additional money may also be available for wages and supplies. Eligibility: These fellowships are available to all full-time, post-CFS faculty in BYU’s College of Humanities. Priority will be granted to faculty who plan to use the fellowship to aid the completion of a substantive research project (for example, a book, an article, or a series of articles). These fellowships are non-renewable and will not be awarded to college faculty who have held a center fellowship in the previous three years. Application: One-year fellowships are competitive. Interested faculty will be asked to complete an application consisting of a current vita and a prospectus of no more than seven double-spaced pages. This prospectus should outline the project, make a case for its significance, explain how the fellowship will be used, and give a time frame for the project’s completion. Deadline: Applications must be received in the College office by 5:00 on March 14th. A committee comprised of Humanities Center fellows from different disciplines will review and rank the applications.For specific questions regarding the application process or for advise on your specific proposal contact Matt Wickman. *Note that the dean must approve all committee decisions. Applicants will be informed of these decisions within a few weeks of the...

Read More